Sunday, April 01, 2012

Rubbermaid Hidden Recycler~Review

I am very excited to introduce you to the Rubbermaid Hidden Recycler that gets recyclables off the counter and hidden out of sight. 
The features of the product include: 
  • Easy attachment to a cabinet door with hooks included with the product or screws
  • A convenient handle allows the bag to easily be transported to wherever your recycling is stored for pick-up or transport
  • A 5 gallon bag that holds up to 36 12-ounce cans and can fit a milk jug
  • The bag has a leak-proof liner and is machine washable to make it easy to clean after any unexpected spills
  • The bag is soft-sided allowing for flexibility inside any cabinet
  • The bag and all packaging is made from recyclable material, and the product is recyclable


Recycling Matters
Setting reusable products on their journey begins in the home~
The importance of recycling—the process of turning a product’s useful parts into a new product to ease the consumption of resources, energy and landfill space—certainly can’t be understated. Recycling a single plastic bottle not only saves hundreds of years in the landfill but also reduces the amount of oil used to produce a new bottle and the emissions created in producing it.

Of course, it all starts at home. No one said recycling would be easy, especially if you’re tight for space. But with a little effort and ingenuity, there’s no reason it needs to be difficult—even if you live in an apartment or have limited storage space for recycling. The key is managing recyclables inside your home prior to transferring them outside—whether it’s to another storage place or to the curb.


Tips for recycling:
• Recycling does require a degree of attention to detail on the part of the recycler. And cleanliness does count—rinsing your cans makes them easier to process, which keeps costs down (and also effectively neutralizes the smell factor in your kitchen).

• DO recycle: steel cans, aluminum cans, newspapers, magazines, catalogs, junk mail, plastic beverage bottles, milk jugs, glass bottles and jars, cereal boxes, other clean and dry cardboard boxes. Probably NOT recyclable: plastic grocery bags, Styrofoam, light bulbs, food-soiled paper, wax paper, ceramics. (Check with your municipality or county for specifics, resources and guidelines.)

• Hazards: Household hazardous wastes like paint cans, motor oil, anti-freeze, car batteries and pesticides typically need to be disposed of separately. (Check online or with your municipality for resources and guidelines.)

• Hardware: Items such as computers, cell phones and even eyewear can be recycled or repurposed. Look online for local organizations that accept them (a host of retail stores across the country, for example, collect cell phones for donation or recycling).

• Food scraps: certain food waste can go into a composter (which could be located under the kitchen sink) and the results can be used later to help fertilize your garden soil. With other food products, choose a covered Rubbermaid Step-on Waste Can with its innovative easy-to-use step-on mechanism. (For composting dos and don’ts as well as a better understanding of composting in general, see compostingcouncil.org.)

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Disclosure~ I received for FREE a Rubbermaid Hidden Recycler to review for this post. All opinions are my own. No other compensation was given or received in order to post my review of the product.

I just luv the Rubbermaid Hidden Recycler! It has many uses not just for collecting recycled materials. My son has since taken the recycler to his room and now uses it to keep his room clean. The handles make it easy to hang from just about anywhere. The beg itself is easy to clean just toss in the washer. It does not loose its shape after being washed and looks brand new after each wash! The bag itself has a leak proof lining for any liquids that are left in the containers. The handle allows you to dump it and not have to touch the items. If you don't want to wash it, you can just wipe it out with a towel or cloth. I like that the bag is made from recycled materials. My family and I give the Rubbermaid hidden Recycler a 5 out of 5 rating. Its easy to assemble and hides out of site.

The Hidden Recycler is currently available for purchase online at Rubbermaid.com and in store at Meijer

For more information on Rubbermaid and their products check out these pages
FACEBOOK
TWITTER
ADVENTURED IN ORGANIZATION BLOG
RUBBERMAID.COM

14 comments:

sueparks2003 said...

I'd choose from what we already recycle glass, plastic, cans and newspaper
Gladys P
sps1113 at yahoo dot com

Sue2Sueper said...

I would use it for cans and plastics. :-) What an awesome product!

Dealsfan32 said...

I would recycle glass, plastic, paper

Claudia .

Tammie Pankuch said...

i think this would benefit me. i would use it for cans.

Jodi Hoppe Wresh said...

mostly recycle cans, and newspaper. CIAwoman66@yahoo.com

Jamie said...

I would recycle cardboard, which is the one thing our trash dump accepts.

Sandy VanHoey said...

I think I would use it for plastics
sandy1955 at comcast dot net

MJD's Mommy said...

I would use it for everything with the right number on it. Cans, plastic, bottles, glass....

Kelly L

Mellanhead said...

I would recycle cans and milk jugs

hangerlady28150 said...

I would recycle newspapers.

Anonymous said...

Rhonda Houchin said.....

We recycle everything you can from glass jars and plastic to milk jugs and cardboard. We even recycle our food scraps, egg shells, coffee and tea to our yard waste can. I try to do my part in keeping less trash from our landfill.

tuffy777 said...

I'd choose all those cat food cans that clutter up my trash.

Jennifer Hatfield said...

I would recycle everything. Right now we just have a tote in the laundry room where we throw all of our recyclables. This would make it so much easier to recycle, and have it out of site!

Aunt Maggie Rocks said...

Definitely plastic!

Maggie Ann True Armstrong
maggie(at)pdclarion(dot)com